I am a PhD candidate in the Linguistics Department at UBC and originally from Texas. My research interests include aspects of the prosody-syntax interface more broadly, and especially about how to model that interface in a polysynthetic language such as Blackfoot. When I am not researching, I can be found dancing. I love any social improvised partner dance, but especially swing, blues, and Argentine tango.

Click the links on the right to learn more about my research program.

Areas of interest

  • Phonology-Syntax Interface theories: prosodic domains and the relation to syntactic constituents
  • Blackfoot, Algonquian, polysynthetic languages
  • Theoretical phonology, sound contrast and categorization
  • Morpho-phonology, allomorphy

Education

2011-present. PhD, University of British Columbia
Target date for completion: August 2017
Title: Prosodic constituency in a polysynthetic languages
Co-supervisors: Rose-Marie Déchaine and Douglas Pulleyblank
2016. Visiting student,University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, AB.
2004-2009. BA (Hons), Rice University
Thesis: The Marrngu Subgroup
Supervisor: Claire Bowern

Desktop publishing

I have been involved with the UBC Working Papers in Linguistics since 2012. We publish proceedings from three conferences (ICSNL, WSCLA, NWLC), as well as Qualifying Papers from students in the department and other miscellaneous volumes. All volumes are listed at https://lingpapers.sites.olt.ubc.ca/.

During my years at UBCWPL I have helped edit a total of eleven volumes [as of 30 September 2016]:

  • As Managing Editor: 3
  • As Co-Editor: 1
  • As Assitant Editor: 1 monograph; 6 conference proceedings

LaTeX contributions

Packages

I have uploaded two linguistic packages to CTAN. If you like them, please drop me a line and let me know. If you think something can be improved or otherwise have comments, also let me know.

leipzig
A package to typeset and index linguistic gloss abbreviations.
textglos
A package to typeset inline linguistic examples.

The leipzig package provides a set of macros for standard glossing abbreviations, with options to create new ones. They are mnemonic (e.g.~verb+Acc{}+ for accusative, abbreviated textsc{acc}). They can be used alone or on top of the glossaries package for easy indexing and glossary printing, e.g. in a footnote.

The textglos package provides a set of macros for in-line linguistic examples of the variety example ‘gloss’ (as opposed to interlinear glossing, set apart from the main text). It prevents hyphenated examples from breaking across lines and consistently formats phonemic examples, orthographic examples, and more.

Classes

  • ubcwpl.cls A class file which conforms to UBCWPL’s stylesheet.
  • sfuwpl.cls A class file which conforms to UBCWPL’s stylesheet.

(Last updated: 1 October 2016)

Courses Currently Teaching

  • 2016. Sessional instructor: The structure of the Blackfoot language,
    University of Lethbridge.

Upcoming courses

  • 2017. Teaching Assistant: Pragmatics,
    UBC, Course instructor: Hotze Rullmann.

Previous courses

  • 2015. Teaching Assistant: Studies in Phonology,
    UBC, Course instructor: Douglas Pulleyblank.
  • 2014. Teaching Assistant: Linguistic Theory and Analysis I, [Handouts]
    UBC, Course instructor: Gunnar Ólafur Hansson.
  • 2014. Teaching Assistant: Linguistic Theory and Analysis II,
    UBC, Course instructor: Hotze Rullman.
  • 2013. Teaching Assistant: Languages of the World,
    UBC, Course instructor: Strang Burton.
  • 2013. Teaching Assistant: Languages of the World,
    UBC, Course instructor: Strang Burton.
  • 2012. Teaching Assistant: Linguistic Theory and Analysis I,
    UBC, Course instructor: Gunnar Ólafur Hansson.
  • 2009. Teaching Assistant: Introduction to Linguistics,
    Rice University, Course instructor: Michel Achard.

(Last updated: 2 November 2016)

A full list of my publications can be found on my CV [last updated: 15 November 2016]. More downloads are available at https://ubc.academia.edu/NatalieWeber.

Recent publications and manuscripts

In press. Déchaine, Rose-Marie and Natalie Weber. Root syntax: Evidence from Algonquian. In Papers of the Forty-seventh Algonquian Conference. (University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Oct. 22–25, 2015), Monica Macaulay (ed.). MSU Press.

In press. Weber, Natalie and Lisa Matthewson. The semantics of Blackfoot arguments. In Papers of the Forty-fifth Algonquian Conference. (University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Oct. 18–20, 2013), Monica Macaulay (ed.). MSU Press.

2016. Weber, Natalie. Accent and prosody in Blackfoot verbs. In Papers of the Forty-fourth Algonquian Conference. (University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, Oct. 25–28, 2012), Monica Macaulay, Margaret Noodin, and J. Randolph Valentine (eds.). SUNY Press.

2014. Weber, Natalie and Lisa Matthewson. Reflections of complement type: The view from Blackfoot. In The Art and Craft of Semantics: A Festschrift for Irene Heim, vol. 2, Luka Crnič and Uli Sauerland (eds.), 275–298. (MITWPL 71). [Link]

2015. Déchaine, Rose-Marie and Natalie Weber. Head-Merge, Adjuct-Merge, and the Syntax of Root Categorisation. In Proceedings of the Poster Session of the 33rd West Coast Conference on Formal Linguistics, Pocholo Umbal and Kyeong-min Kim (eds.), 38–47. (SFUWPL 5). [Link]

2013. Weber, Natalie. Accent and pro-DPs in Blackfoot. In Proceedings of the annual meeting of the Canadian Linguistics Association. (University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, June 1–3, 2013), Shan Luo (ed.). N.p. [Link]

Recent posters and presentations

2016. Natalie Weber. Phonologically-conditioned allomorphy in Blackfoot nouns. Paper, Alberta Conference on Linguistics. University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Oct. 29, 2016. [Slides]

2016. Natalie Weber. Blackfoot reflexes of Proto-Algonquian clusters in *ʔ and *h. Paper, 48th Algonquian Conference. Electa Quinney Institute, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Oct. 14–16, 2016. [Handout]

2016. Weber, Natalie. The effects of categorization on prosodic constituency. Poster, The Effects of Constituency on Sentence Phonology Workshop. University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, Jul. 29–31, 2016. [Link to academia.edu]

2015. Déchaine, Rose-Marie and Natalie Weber. Root syntax: Evidence from Algonquian. Paper, 47th Algonquian Conference. University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Oct. 25–28, 2015.

2015. Déchaine, Rose-Marie and Natalie Weber. Head-Merge, Adjunct-Merge, and the Syntax of Root
Categorisation. The Blackfoot Workshop. University of California, Berkeley, Jun. 24–27, 2015.

2015. Déchaine, Rose-Marie and Natalie Weber. Head-Merge, Adjunct-Merge, and the Syntax of Root Categorisation. Poster, 33rd West Coast Conference on Formal Linguistics (WCCFL 33). Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, BC, Mar. 27–29, 2015. [Link to academia.edu]

2014. Weber, Natalie and Lisa Matthewson. The non-uniformity of Blackfoot arguments. Paper, Semantics of Under-Represented Languages in the Americas (SULA) 8. Commentator: Angelika Kratzer. University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, May 17, 2014.

Qualifying Papers

2016. Weber,Natalie. Predicate features and imperfectivity in Blackfoot. In Proceedings of the Qualifying Papers Mini-conferences 2013–2014, Andrei Anghelescu, Joel Dunham, and Natalie Weber (eds.), 249-273. (UBCWPL 42). [Link]

2016. Weber, Natalie. Initial extrametricality and cyclicity in Blackfoot accent. In Proceedings of the Qualifying Papers Mini-conferences 2013–2014, Andrei Anghelescu, Joel Dunham, and Natalie Weber (eds.), 234-248. UBCWPL 42). [Link]

Unpublished Manuscripts

Mostly old class papers.

2012. Weber, Natalie. Labial spreading in Tlingit. Ms, University of British Columbia. [Link]

2012. Weber, Natalie. Verbal agreement of datives in Nyangumarta. Ms, University of British Columbia. [Link]

2012. Weber, Natalie and Blake Allen. Blackfoot pitch accent: Insights from morpho-phonology. Ms, University of British Columbia. [Link to paper and poster]

(Last updated: 2 November 2016)

Broadly speaking, I study aspects of language at the prosody-syntax interface. I am especially interested in the relation of prosodic domains within the phonological word, and their correspondence with morphology. A related thread of my research deals with morphophonological allomorphy, and whether it is lexically defined or phonologically-conditioned.

My language of research is Blackfoot, an Algonquian language spoken in southern Alberta and northern Montana. I have worked with speakers of Blackfoot since 2011, and am currently undertaking fieldwork in Lethbridge, AB while I teach a course at the University of Lethbridge on the linguistic structure of Blackfoot.

During the summer of 2016 I was a Research Assistant and Contributor to the Blackfoot online dictionary project. In particular, I oversaw major revisions to the “parts of speech” categories and classification of morphemes. For the digital version of the dictionary, we have expanded the number of parts of speech categories, and we classify roots, affixes, and stems differently. My hope is that the summer of 2016 will create a stable database structure that can easily be added to as we learn more about Blackfoot categories.

(Last updated: 2 November 2016)

My CV can be downloaded here [last updated: 15 November 2016].

Groups: