Christopher Hammerly

Assistant Professor
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Research Area

Education

Ph.D., University of Massachusetts Amherst, 2020
B.A., University of Minnesota, 2014
B.S., University of Minnesota, 2014

About

I am a descendent of the White Earth Nation in Minnesota, and much of my work focuses on understanding and documenting my ancestral language Anishinaabemowin (Ojibwe). I use a variety of methods to understand the cognitive representations and processes underpinning human knowledge of syntax (sentence structure) and morphology (word structure), including formal theories, fieldwork, computational models, and experimental tasks. I am particularly interested in the nature of the basic units of morphosyntax (person, number, and noun classification), how these units participate in long-distance dependencies such as movement and agreement, and how the work of linguists can be applied to create curricula and technologies for language revitalization.

I am currently in the early stages of starting the Experimental Linguistics and Fieldwork Lab (ELF-Lab), which seeks to bring methods traditionally confined to laboratory settings directly to communities to inform work on language revitalization and broaden the scope of psycholinguistic theories. Please reach out if you are interested in getting involved!


Christopher Hammerly

Assistant Professor
file_download Download CV

Ph.D., University of Massachusetts Amherst, 2020
B.A., University of Minnesota, 2014
B.S., University of Minnesota, 2014

I am a descendent of the White Earth Nation in Minnesota, and much of my work focuses on understanding and documenting my ancestral language Anishinaabemowin (Ojibwe). I use a variety of methods to understand the cognitive representations and processes underpinning human knowledge of syntax (sentence structure) and morphology (word structure), including formal theories, fieldwork, computational models, and experimental tasks. I am particularly interested in the nature of the basic units of morphosyntax (person, number, and noun classification), how these units participate in long-distance dependencies such as movement and agreement, and how the work of linguists can be applied to create curricula and technologies for language revitalization.

I am currently in the early stages of starting the Experimental Linguistics and Fieldwork Lab (ELF-Lab), which seeks to bring methods traditionally confined to laboratory settings directly to communities to inform work on language revitalization and broaden the scope of psycholinguistic theories. Please reach out if you are interested in getting involved!

Christopher Hammerly

Assistant Professor
file_download Download CV

Ph.D., University of Massachusetts Amherst, 2020
B.A., University of Minnesota, 2014
B.S., University of Minnesota, 2014

I am a descendent of the White Earth Nation in Minnesota, and much of my work focuses on understanding and documenting my ancestral language Anishinaabemowin (Ojibwe). I use a variety of methods to understand the cognitive representations and processes underpinning human knowledge of syntax (sentence structure) and morphology (word structure), including formal theories, fieldwork, computational models, and experimental tasks. I am particularly interested in the nature of the basic units of morphosyntax (person, number, and noun classification), how these units participate in long-distance dependencies such as movement and agreement, and how the work of linguists can be applied to create curricula and technologies for language revitalization.

I am currently in the early stages of starting the Experimental Linguistics and Fieldwork Lab (ELF-Lab), which seeks to bring methods traditionally confined to laboratory settings directly to communities to inform work on language revitalization and broaden the scope of psycholinguistic theories. Please reach out if you are interested in getting involved!