Rose Underhill

PhD Student

About

 

My research interests include the semantics and syntax of discourse structure, perspective, and reference tracking; more recently, I have also begun work with the semantics of number marking and group formation. I am primarily a field worker—I collaborate with speakers to compare linguistic theory against their expert knowledge, both here in Vancouver and in their speech-communities.

So far my work has focused primarily on Ktunaxa, a language isolate spoken in southeastern B.C., as well as across the border in northern Montana and Idaho. I am also increasingly involved in work with Tlingit, a Na-Dene language of Yukon, northern B.C., and southeast Alaska. For both languages, I am interested in how their syntax, semantics, and ontologies can contribute to and challenge linguistic theory at large, particularly since they and other minority languages are under-represented in theoretic literature. I am also committed to interweaving my goals as an academic researcher with those of my language consultants; I feel that a reciprocal exchange of knowledge and expertise is an important part of maintaining a healthy research relationship.

In my non-linguist life, I study Welsh (shwmae pawb!), make things, and weed my garden.


Rose Underhill

PhD Student

 

My research interests include the semantics and syntax of discourse structure, perspective, and reference tracking; more recently, I have also begun work with the semantics of number marking and group formation. I am primarily a field worker—I collaborate with speakers to compare linguistic theory against their expert knowledge, both here in Vancouver and in their speech-communities.

So far my work has focused primarily on Ktunaxa, a language isolate spoken in southeastern B.C., as well as across the border in northern Montana and Idaho. I am also increasingly involved in work with Tlingit, a Na-Dene language of Yukon, northern B.C., and southeast Alaska. For both languages, I am interested in how their syntax, semantics, and ontologies can contribute to and challenge linguistic theory at large, particularly since they and other minority languages are under-represented in theoretic literature. I am also committed to interweaving my goals as an academic researcher with those of my language consultants; I feel that a reciprocal exchange of knowledge and expertise is an important part of maintaining a healthy research relationship.

In my non-linguist life, I study Welsh (shwmae pawb!), make things, and weed my garden.

Rose Underhill

PhD Student

 

My research interests include the semantics and syntax of discourse structure, perspective, and reference tracking; more recently, I have also begun work with the semantics of number marking and group formation. I am primarily a field worker—I collaborate with speakers to compare linguistic theory against their expert knowledge, both here in Vancouver and in their speech-communities.

So far my work has focused primarily on Ktunaxa, a language isolate spoken in southeastern B.C., as well as across the border in northern Montana and Idaho. I am also increasingly involved in work with Tlingit, a Na-Dene language of Yukon, northern B.C., and southeast Alaska. For both languages, I am interested in how their syntax, semantics, and ontologies can contribute to and challenge linguistic theory at large, particularly since they and other minority languages are under-represented in theoretic literature. I am also committed to interweaving my goals as an academic researcher with those of my language consultants; I feel that a reciprocal exchange of knowledge and expertise is an important part of maintaining a healthy research relationship.

In my non-linguist life, I study Welsh (shwmae pawb!), make things, and weed my garden.