Amanda Cardoso

Lecturer

Research Area

About

 

My research program overall seeks to understand language variation and change and the relationship to the historical socio-cultural contexts. Within this program I have generally focused on three main themes: 1. language variation and change with reference to changes is populations (e.g. large-scale population movements and regional variation/dialect emergence); 2. Methodological advancements for studying variation, specifically with regards to acoustic analysis of speech sound and voice quality; 3. Differences is subjective perceptions of varieties in English (as it relates to regional and ethnically variation), the potential bias that comes from these differences, and how that translates into observable differences in real-world contexts. While much of my previous work has been on varieties of English, I am currently involved in collaborative projects that investigate variation and change in two indigenous languages (Tlingit and ʔayʔaǰuθəm) and assess current methods of studying variation in these contexts as well as propose other methods that may be more appropriate for understanding variation in languages with limited data or which are not similar socio-culturally or structurally to the languages that have historically been the focus of variation and change research. Therefore, my research straddles the subfields of sociolinguistics, phonetics, phonology and dialectology.

 

I completed my PhD and MSc at the University of Edinburgh, where I explored dialect emergence in Liverpool and the population movements that have been suggested to be the cause of this dialect emergence. My undergraduate degree was completed at the University of Victoria.


Research


Publications

  • in press. Hall-Lew, Lauren, Amanda Cardoso, Emma Davies. Three Waves, One Story: The GOAT vowel in San Francisco English. In Lauren Hall-Lew, Emma Moore, Robert J. Podesva, eds. Social Meaning and Linguistic Variation: Theorizing the Third Wave.
  • 2019. Devyani Sharma, Erez Levon, Dominic Watt, Yang Ye, Amanda Cardoso. Methods for the study of accent bias and access to elite professions. Language and Discrimination.
  • 2019. Vincent Hughes, Amanda Cardoso, Philip Harrison, Paul Foulkes, Peter French, Amelia J. Gully. Forensic voice comparison using long-term acoustic measures of laryngeal voice quality. Proceedings of the International Conference of the Phonetic Sciences.
  • 2019. Amanda Cardoso, Erez Levon, Devyani Sharma, Dominic Watt, and Yang Ye. Inter-Speaker Variation and the Evaluation of British English Accents in Employment Contexts. Proceedings of the International Conference of the Phonetic Sciences.
  • 2016. Cardoso, Amanda, Lauren Hall-Lew, Yova Kementchedjhieva and Ruaridh Purse. Between California and the Pacific Northwest: The Front Lax Vowels in San Francisco English. In Valerie Fridland, Tyler Kendall, Betsy Evans and AliciaWassink, eds. Speech in theWestern States, Volume 1: The Coastal States. Publication of the American Dialect Society. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.
  • 2015. Cardoso, Amanda. Variation in Nasal-Obstruent Clusters and its influence on PRICE and MOUTH in Scouse. English Language and Linguistics.

Additional Description

You can check out my CV here (current as of May 2020)


Amanda Cardoso

Lecturer
email

 

My research program overall seeks to understand language variation and change and the relationship to the historical socio-cultural contexts. Within this program I have generally focused on three main themes: 1. language variation and change with reference to changes is populations (e.g. large-scale population movements and regional variation/dialect emergence); 2. Methodological advancements for studying variation, specifically with regards to acoustic analysis of speech sound and voice quality; 3. Differences is subjective perceptions of varieties in English (as it relates to regional and ethnically variation), the potential bias that comes from these differences, and how that translates into observable differences in real-world contexts. While much of my previous work has been on varieties of English, I am currently involved in collaborative projects that investigate variation and change in two indigenous languages (Tlingit and ʔayʔaǰuθəm) and assess current methods of studying variation in these contexts as well as propose other methods that may be more appropriate for understanding variation in languages with limited data or which are not similar socio-culturally or structurally to the languages that have historically been the focus of variation and change research. Therefore, my research straddles the subfields of sociolinguistics, phonetics, phonology and dialectology.

 

I completed my PhD and MSc at the University of Edinburgh, where I explored dialect emergence in Liverpool and the population movements that have been suggested to be the cause of this dialect emergence. My undergraduate degree was completed at the University of Victoria.

  • in press. Hall-Lew, Lauren, Amanda Cardoso, Emma Davies. Three Waves, One Story: The GOAT vowel in San Francisco English. In Lauren Hall-Lew, Emma Moore, Robert J. Podesva, eds. Social Meaning and Linguistic Variation: Theorizing the Third Wave.
  • 2019. Devyani Sharma, Erez Levon, Dominic Watt, Yang Ye, Amanda Cardoso. Methods for the study of accent bias and access to elite professions. Language and Discrimination.
  • 2019. Vincent Hughes, Amanda Cardoso, Philip Harrison, Paul Foulkes, Peter French, Amelia J. Gully. Forensic voice comparison using long-term acoustic measures of laryngeal voice quality. Proceedings of the International Conference of the Phonetic Sciences.
  • 2019. Amanda Cardoso, Erez Levon, Devyani Sharma, Dominic Watt, and Yang Ye. Inter-Speaker Variation and the Evaluation of British English Accents in Employment Contexts. Proceedings of the International Conference of the Phonetic Sciences.
  • 2016. Cardoso, Amanda, Lauren Hall-Lew, Yova Kementchedjhieva and Ruaridh Purse. Between California and the Pacific Northwest: The Front Lax Vowels in San Francisco English. In Valerie Fridland, Tyler Kendall, Betsy Evans and AliciaWassink, eds. Speech in theWestern States, Volume 1: The Coastal States. Publication of the American Dialect Society. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.
  • 2015. Cardoso, Amanda. Variation in Nasal-Obstruent Clusters and its influence on PRICE and MOUTH in Scouse. English Language and Linguistics.

You can check out my CV here (current as of May 2020)

Amanda Cardoso

Lecturer
email

 

My research program overall seeks to understand language variation and change and the relationship to the historical socio-cultural contexts. Within this program I have generally focused on three main themes: 1. language variation and change with reference to changes is populations (e.g. large-scale population movements and regional variation/dialect emergence); 2. Methodological advancements for studying variation, specifically with regards to acoustic analysis of speech sound and voice quality; 3. Differences is subjective perceptions of varieties in English (as it relates to regional and ethnically variation), the potential bias that comes from these differences, and how that translates into observable differences in real-world contexts. While much of my previous work has been on varieties of English, I am currently involved in collaborative projects that investigate variation and change in two indigenous languages (Tlingit and ʔayʔaǰuθəm) and assess current methods of studying variation in these contexts as well as propose other methods that may be more appropriate for understanding variation in languages with limited data or which are not similar socio-culturally or structurally to the languages that have historically been the focus of variation and change research. Therefore, my research straddles the subfields of sociolinguistics, phonetics, phonology and dialectology.

 

I completed my PhD and MSc at the University of Edinburgh, where I explored dialect emergence in Liverpool and the population movements that have been suggested to be the cause of this dialect emergence. My undergraduate degree was completed at the University of Victoria.

  • in press. Hall-Lew, Lauren, Amanda Cardoso, Emma Davies. Three Waves, One Story: The GOAT vowel in San Francisco English. In Lauren Hall-Lew, Emma Moore, Robert J. Podesva, eds. Social Meaning and Linguistic Variation: Theorizing the Third Wave.
  • 2019. Devyani Sharma, Erez Levon, Dominic Watt, Yang Ye, Amanda Cardoso. Methods for the study of accent bias and access to elite professions. Language and Discrimination.
  • 2019. Vincent Hughes, Amanda Cardoso, Philip Harrison, Paul Foulkes, Peter French, Amelia J. Gully. Forensic voice comparison using long-term acoustic measures of laryngeal voice quality. Proceedings of the International Conference of the Phonetic Sciences.
  • 2019. Amanda Cardoso, Erez Levon, Devyani Sharma, Dominic Watt, and Yang Ye. Inter-Speaker Variation and the Evaluation of British English Accents in Employment Contexts. Proceedings of the International Conference of the Phonetic Sciences.
  • 2016. Cardoso, Amanda, Lauren Hall-Lew, Yova Kementchedjhieva and Ruaridh Purse. Between California and the Pacific Northwest: The Front Lax Vowels in San Francisco English. In Valerie Fridland, Tyler Kendall, Betsy Evans and AliciaWassink, eds. Speech in theWestern States, Volume 1: The Coastal States. Publication of the American Dialect Society. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.
  • 2015. Cardoso, Amanda. Variation in Nasal-Obstruent Clusters and its influence on PRICE and MOUTH in Scouse. English Language and Linguistics.

You can check out my CV here (current as of May 2020)