Gloria Mellesmoen

PhD Candidate | Sessional Lecturer
launchWebsite
Research Areas
Education

MA, University of Toronto, 2016
BA, Simon Fraser University, 2015


About

About Me: I am pursuing a PhD in linguistics with an interest in phonology, non-concatenative morphology, and historical/comparative linguistics. My dissertation research focuses on reduplication across all 23 Salish languages, drawing upon primary fieldwork and archival materials. My research focuses on questions about n0n-concatenative morphology (and allomorphy), multiple reduplication, pluractionality, and degree semantics.

I am currently doing fieldwork with speakers of ʔayʔaǰuθəm (Comox-Sliammon), a Coast Salish language, and Secwepemctsín (Shuswap).

Generally, my research falls within phonetics, phonology, or morphology. At present, I am interested in sound changes from Proto-Salish and the morphophonology and semantics of reduplication, from a synchronic and diachronic (comparative Salish) perspective. I am also interested in questions related to variation and heritage languages (drawing on my background in sociolinguistics) in the context of First Nations languages.

If I wasn’t a linguist, I’d probably be an archeologist or a historian. (I also have a great fondness for medieval literature.)

Teaching:

  • LING 101 (in 2021W2)
  • LING 445 (in 2020W2)

Research Interests:

  • historical linguistics
  • reduplication
  • sound change
  • sociophonology
  • pluractionality
  • BC English
  • ʔayʔaǰuθəm (Comox-Sliammon)
  • Secwepemctsín (Shuswap)
  • Comparative Salish

Teaching


Gloria Mellesmoen

PhD Candidate | Sessional Lecturer
launchWebsite
Research Areas
Education

MA, University of Toronto, 2016
BA, Simon Fraser University, 2015


About

About Me: I am pursuing a PhD in linguistics with an interest in phonology, non-concatenative morphology, and historical/comparative linguistics. My dissertation research focuses on reduplication across all 23 Salish languages, drawing upon primary fieldwork and archival materials. My research focuses on questions about n0n-concatenative morphology (and allomorphy), multiple reduplication, pluractionality, and degree semantics.

I am currently doing fieldwork with speakers of ʔayʔaǰuθəm (Comox-Sliammon), a Coast Salish language, and Secwepemctsín (Shuswap).

Generally, my research falls within phonetics, phonology, or morphology. At present, I am interested in sound changes from Proto-Salish and the morphophonology and semantics of reduplication, from a synchronic and diachronic (comparative Salish) perspective. I am also interested in questions related to variation and heritage languages (drawing on my background in sociolinguistics) in the context of First Nations languages.

If I wasn’t a linguist, I’d probably be an archeologist or a historian. (I also have a great fondness for medieval literature.)

Teaching:

  • LING 101 (in 2021W2)
  • LING 445 (in 2020W2)

Research Interests:

  • historical linguistics
  • reduplication
  • sound change
  • sociophonology
  • pluractionality
  • BC English
  • ʔayʔaǰuθəm (Comox-Sliammon)
  • Secwepemctsín (Shuswap)
  • Comparative Salish

Teaching


Gloria Mellesmoen

PhD Candidate | Sessional Lecturer
launchWebsite
Research Areas
Education

MA, University of Toronto, 2016
BA, Simon Fraser University, 2015

About Me: I am pursuing a PhD in linguistics with an interest in phonology, non-concatenative morphology, and historical/comparative linguistics. My dissertation research focuses on reduplication across all 23 Salish languages, drawing upon primary fieldwork and archival materials. My research focuses on questions about n0n-concatenative morphology (and allomorphy), multiple reduplication, pluractionality, and degree semantics.

I am currently doing fieldwork with speakers of ʔayʔaǰuθəm (Comox-Sliammon), a Coast Salish language, and Secwepemctsín (Shuswap).

Generally, my research falls within phonetics, phonology, or morphology. At present, I am interested in sound changes from Proto-Salish and the morphophonology and semantics of reduplication, from a synchronic and diachronic (comparative Salish) perspective. I am also interested in questions related to variation and heritage languages (drawing on my background in sociolinguistics) in the context of First Nations languages.

If I wasn't a linguist, I'd probably be an archeologist or a historian. (I also have a great fondness for medieval literature.)

Teaching:

  • LING 101 (in 2021W2)
  • LING 445 (in 2020W2)

Research Interests:

  • historical linguistics
  • reduplication
  • sound change
  • sociophonology
  • pluractionality
  • BC English
  • ʔayʔaǰuθəm (Comox-Sliammon)
  • Secwepemctsín (Shuswap)
  • Comparative Salish